* Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

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allenawilson
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Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by allenawilson » 24 Jan 2021 17:41

Many fact sentences use "age." When the sentences are printed in a report or narrative, the result is " .....aged 6." In my opinion, the sentence would read better if it said "......aged 6 years." Am I just being OCD? Is there a genealogical standard for this? I know how to change this in TOOLS>Fact Types>Edit, but wanted some opinions before I got too far.

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tatewise
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Re: Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by tatewise » 24 Jan 2021 17:55

Please consider all the possible values for Age. Click on the [...] button to the right of the Age field.
e.g.
Any combination of Years, Months, Days
Younger than or Older than the age given
Child, Infant, or Stillborn

Those are all the standard GEDCOM & FH options, but most of them would not read well if always followed by " years".
i.e. It might say "... aged 6 months years." or " ... aged 6 months 3 days or more years."
Mike Tate ~ researching the Tate and Scott family history ~ tatewise ancestry

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allenawilson
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Re: Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by allenawilson » 24 Jan 2021 18:09

Mr. Tate, thanks for the reply. I understand and will leave it the way it is.

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RS3100
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Re: Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by RS3100 » 24 Jan 2021 18:48

How do other users deal with ages that are obviously inconsistent or wrong? I am in the habit of recording an age in the age field whenever it is shown in a source record, even if it is incorrect, as a record of what was recorded in the original document. If no age is stated, I leave the field blank and let FH apply it's own calculation in the property box.

The sentence as it appears in reports says, "He appeared in ... aged 30" for example. I appreciate the sentence can be interpreted as stating the age shown in the source document, but it does read as if it were the actual age of the individual at that time, especially to a reader who doesn't know how it was derived.

I have a relative who was somewhat creative with her age throughout her life, and noticed today that her narrative report reads, "She appeared in the 1851 census aged 42. She appeared in the 1861 census aged 47". Both are under her true age by some margin, as well as being mutually inconsistent.

I suppose I could alter the sentence template to state, "She appeared in the 1851 census where her age was recorded as 42", but I wondered how others approach this?

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BillH
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Re: Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by BillH » 24 Jan 2021 18:58

I do it the same way you do. I don't mind that the sentences show an incorrect age. For a census, for example, it says "she appeared... age x". This is the age that was in the census so she did appear in the census to be that age.

Bill
Bill Henshaw

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RS3100
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Re: Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by RS3100 » 25 Jan 2021 09:44

Thanks Bill.

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dewilkinson
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Re: Fact Sentences that use "Aged"

Post by dewilkinson » 25 Jan 2021 10:11

I do it the same way as well, recording the age given on the document for a fact. This records it as it is. However, I do make a note under the birth record such as "The 1861 census suggest she was born in ........". I do the same for birth places as well which can also vary.
David Wilkinson researching Bowtle, Butcher, Edwards, Gillingham, Overett, Ransome, Simpson, and Wilkinson in East Anglia

Deterioration is contagious, and places are destroyed or renovated by the spirit of the people who go to them

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